Reports From The Field IV

Rain, Rain, Go Away!

As we arrive in June and as the rains continue to fall, we have to take a look at everything we have been able to accomplish in Bella Maria thus far. Our goal of having 3,000 bricks made for the community center has been surpassed, so we think. This number may seem arbitrary, however it has been chosen because if we are to reach that goal, it will allow for a cushion in case some blocks are either misshapen, or damaged in the drying process. This is one of the things we hope to find out today, did we make it?

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After an hour and a half in the trucks, driving through one of the most beautiful landscapes it is the hot topic, “Do we have enough bricks?”. Of course we have all been counting in our heads for the past three weeks and all have a different total sum of bricks in mind, the variable which determines our fate is something that has been looming over our heads for days, weeks now, it is the rain. The rainy season which is normally over in April, has continued through May and during the entire duration of the “Service Learning” trip during the second week of May.

As we arrive in the community of Bella Maria, we see the community members hard at work. They have begun the arduous process of cleaning, shaping, and moving the adobe bricks. This a very important process for many reasons. For one, the blocks need to be consistent in the thickness of each block to ensure the quality and the stability of the structure. Another is when we move the blocks from one area to another to make space, we are able to see how many of the blocks are damaged, or misshapen. Also, cleaning off the bricks of any residual mud, dirt or any other material that could hinder the adhesion process later on, or could make it difficult when trying to make each layer of bricks level.

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As a group we all began to clean, shape and stack the bricks in new locations from where they were previously to aid in the drying process, and analyze whether the bricks were dry, still a little wet, or if they rain had not allowed them to dry hardly at all. We also dug new trenches, and cleaned out and made the existing trenches bigger and deeper to help keep the bricks as dry as possible. During this process we were able to get the dryer bricks to be stacked and covered securely, as well as move the bricks that were in spots that were prone to heavy rain and pooling. This was great in terms of seeing tangibly where we are in the brick making process. We were able to establish that not as many bricks were damaged by the rains, and we had achieved our goal to have 3,000 bricks and more than the needed 2,600 working bricks!

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Of course all this work has a timeline these days, when the rains seem inevitable. So of course, as we work we keep an eye to the sky to make sure that we can get all the bricks covered before the rains hit and potentially cause damage to any bricks. Of course, the rains arrived around the time we had expected, and we were able to get everything covered in time. Which, unfortunately significantly shortens our works days when the rains arrive early, or even when you expect them to in the early afternoons. Hopefully soon the rains stop for a little while and allow the bricks to dry, as well as giving the community of Bella Maria and us time to construct the community center. However, for now, it’s time to head back up to the top of the mountain and prepare ourselves for another day. Thankfully Don Victor has a vehicle capable of making it through the mountainous road in all weather conditions.

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Until next time!

-Charlie

Charlie Fulks is starting the first year of his master’s program in the International Development Studies program at Ohio University. This is his first trip to Ecuador with the Healthy Living Initiative and the Tropical Disease Institute.

Reports From The Field III

Wow! I have already been in Ecuador for 3 and half weeks. I can be really cliché and say “time fly’s when you’re having fun,” but you get the idea.  Working with the Healthily Living Initiative is very rewarding and I feel there are a plethora of opportunities for me to explore, as it becomes time for me to focus on the topic of my research. Throughout the time I have been here so far, we have already seen one group come and go. The Service Learning group where the first to come and work with us this summer and truly worked hard. This group worked in the community of Bellamaria on the construction of a communal house that will be used for several functions within the community.  The group worked in the adobe brick building process. This was not an easy task but everyone gave their best efforts to make the bricks. The process consist of shifting sand, mixing the sand and water until it reaches a mud like consistency while adding hay to hold everything together. After the mud mixture is ready it goes into a square-shaped mold to form the shape of the bricks.  The group worked everyday on the bricks. There was a small group who also participated in English and Computation lessons in the schools of Guara, Chaquiza and Bellamaría. The last day that the group was there the school of Bellamaria had a performance for the SL group that was delightful. Afterwards the SL group had their own performance for the community “The Chicken Dance!!” The schoolchildren as well as the rest of the community were laughing as the SL group preformed and everyone had a blast.

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In the evening we had a small going away party for the SL group at their hotel. We were caught by surprise when Don Victor, the man who knows everyone in our town and wonderful driver started singing and had a concert. Afterwards, there was a guitar that was being passed around while the musicians in the groups showed their talents. Esteban Baus and Peter Mather both took the stage and surprised us all with their solo performances.

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As time moves on, I am getting excited about the future and the research I will be working on. Like I said before there are so many opportunities to make an impact!

-Nelson Patterson

Reports From The Field II

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Working on the adobes has been tough, but very rewarding to see the progress we have made. As of now the part I like the most is the actual filling the molds with the wet cement-like mud, which are used to create the adobe bricks. It is fun getting down and dirty with mud and forming the bricks, plus your hands feel very smooth as the mud is an exfoliant. After being sick for the past few days I feel rejuvenated me and I have been very productive.  Today is also the last full day that the Service Learning team is in Bellamaria. We were given Service Learning t-shirts to where for today and tomorrow and now I can officially say I have gotten my first free t-shirt from Ohio University!!

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During needed water breaks throughout the day I talked with a few SL volunteers to see if they are enjoying the trip and the majority really had a great time! I am impressed how willing they are to work and push their comfort level by interacting with the community members of Bellamaria and trying their best to communicate with them.  Towards the end of the day much of the time was spent moving the adobe bricks so the rain would not destroy them. The adobe bricks are heavy and when they are not completely dry there is a risk of breaking them when picking them up so you have to be very careful.  The SL team and I worked on stacking the bricks and putting them in a place where the rains would not harm the hard work we have done throughout their week here.

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Tomorrow there will be a going away party for the Service Learning group and the community members! It should be fun seeing everyone interacting and dancing together!

-Nelson Patterson

Friday the 13th and our Open House

 

Friday the thirteenth, the day we were all expecting with a strange mix of excitement and dread. We were super excited about Healthy Living’s open house. The open house was HL’s closing event, where we would be showcasing what the team and the community members had been working on together for the past few weeks. On the other hand we were dreading two things: the bad luck of a Friday the 13th- which fortunately waited until the event was finished to manifest- and, more than anything, we dreaded the thought of having to say goodbye to the people of Chaquizhca, Guara and Bella Maria. People who had so warmly opened their homes, schools, and their hearts to us.

We arrived very early in the morning to set everything up, gosh I had like 300 drawings from the story telling and participatory project I was working on at the local schools. Lucky for me the children arrived shortly and came to my rescue. Later, some folks from our french ally institution Tsiky Tzanaka joined in, and we were done in the nick of time. The party started at around 10 in the morning, it was the perfect mix of a cultural fair and a gathering between good friends. There were booths with local produce and crafts, others with some creative work from the members of the HL team, and some from local partners and institutions. There were interactive activities like the solar clock, which aimed to show community members traditional alternatives to new technologies that have been forgotten; the family photo booth and community photo shows; the balance and jumping ropes for the children. I was in charge of the children’s room, where the drawings from the story telling and participatory sketching activities were showcased, along with art projects from the children’s class work. It was a very nice experience, having people come and explaining what the children and I had worked on for the entire month, why it was relevant and what was next.

Later on, there were performances from the children and community members. The best moment for me was when I found out the community members had set up a snack post with traditional Latin-American delights like empanadas and salchi-papas (fries and wienies); I always loved those back in Colombia and had missed them a lot. We concluded the event with a nice lunch and warm goodbyes. The children asked me “Lily, Lily!!! are you coming back next year?” I smiled cautiously and answered “God willing, I will try ” I was sad about the uncertainty of it all, but I felt worse about people who were probably asked the same question, but knew for sure they were not coming back. Still, whether we planned on coming back or not, we hoped that the communities had found our presence as enjoyable as we had found their company, and that our work had impacted their lives at least half as much as it did our souls.

Going home, Friday the 13th started kicking in: two vans had flat tires, we encountered all kinds of crazy stuff on the road, but at the end of the day there was nothing but satisfaction in the memory of that day. As we shared dinner and drinks we also shared warm and happy memories, funny anecdotes and jokes about some not so pleasant experiences. The open house had closed, but we hope that the hearts we tried to reach during our time there would remain open.

Apart from the display of children’s drawings, there are also other booths of Clinic, Entomology, Mammal, Entomology, Healthy Living, and some agriculture products and souvenirs bought to the Open House by local people. Let’s see what we have for the day.

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Link to the original post: http://oueduabroad.wordpress.com/2012/07/27/open-houses-open-hearts-and-bitter-sweet-farewells/

Summer Foreign Correspondence for Office of Education Aboard

Lily Acevedo, a Development Team member and participant in Tropical Disease Institute summer program in Ecuador, has become one of Summer Foreign Correspondents for Office of Education Aboard at Ohio University. Follow their blog and read our correspondence articles for OEA. The first article by Lily has been published here:

http://oueduabroad.wordpress.com/2012/06/19/reclaiming-our-world-through-sharing-it-with-othersa-few-notes-on-the-saraguro-peoples-community-based-tourism-model/