Reports From The Field V

It is around 8 o’clock in the morning and as we drive from breakfast to Guara, the community we are to work in, we are greeted by mist floating in the valleys. The scenery is very soothing and calming that it seems to have stepped out of a painting. When we get to our destined drop off points in order to hike to the more inland communities for our various activities, the dew on the grass and trees cling to our clothes and belongings. As we walk down the valley and hop from root to ground, we discuss strategies on how to approach the community members and make the activities community-led. This has become our daily ritual for the communities are dynamic and always full of surprises – good surprises.

The community of Guara is seated on a very mountainous landscape sweeping beyond what any eye can see. Green mountains hold each others hands as they reach for the horizon and touch the blue sky which is filled with beautiful white clouds. Trees and fields of corn and other crops grace the lee-sides of the mountains dancing to the sway of the breeze. Every person we bypass greets us with such openness and warmth. The dogs seem to be on edge more than ever for they bark out loudly as we approach various yards. We walk eagerly so as to get to our destinations faster, but to get away from the dogs as well. Don Darwin, our local coordinator, assures us that the dogs are more of guards than attackers so there is nothing to worry about.

We finally get to one of the houses after about 45 minutes of hiking. We are welcomed very warmly, and even if I personally have no idea what is been said, they are adamant on speaking to me. All I do is smile, nod, and focusing on the facial expressions of the speaker, I speak the little Spanish I know i.e. “si”, “no” and other agreeing sounds. After “talking” for about 5 minutes, our program director rescues me from my masquerade and I carry on to observing the conversation. I presume my crush-course Spanish lessons on YouTube did not pay off. THe challenges of not speaking the language is sometimes frustrating, but the Spanish speakers on the team are patient enough to explain every detail, and always encourage us (the non-Spanish speakers) to always ask questions. I presume by the time the summer is over, some decent Spanish will be spoken by many of us. This only shows that in as much as we are offering something to the communities, they are also giving us something live-sustaining – a new language.

The communities not only offer us the chance to practice Spanish, but their time as well. They are very hard working, and tend to leave their work in order to hear what we have to say. They are very patient and take their time to understand our various projects and usually offer their time to attend the various activities that we have set up. They also inform us how various projects done in the past aid them and that gives them the zeal to want to learn more from the current ones. This makes me realize that without the communities’ full involvement, the projects would not take much root. Am so glad that the communities embrace not only us, but our work as well. This gives us the enthusiasm to woke up each morning to do a great day’s work!

-Kombe

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s