Reports From The Field II

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Working on the adobes has been tough, but very rewarding to see the progress we have made. As of now the part I like the most is the actual filling the molds with the wet cement-like mud, which are used to create the adobe bricks. It is fun getting down and dirty with mud and forming the bricks, plus your hands feel very smooth as the mud is an exfoliant. After being sick for the past few days I feel rejuvenated me and I have been very productive.  Today is also the last full day that the Service Learning team is in Bellamaria. We were given Service Learning t-shirts to where for today and tomorrow and now I can officially say I have gotten my first free t-shirt from Ohio University!!

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During needed water breaks throughout the day I talked with a few SL volunteers to see if they are enjoying the trip and the majority really had a great time! I am impressed how willing they are to work and push their comfort level by interacting with the community members of Bellamaria and trying their best to communicate with them.  Towards the end of the day much of the time was spent moving the adobe bricks so the rain would not destroy them. The adobe bricks are heavy and when they are not completely dry there is a risk of breaking them when picking them up so you have to be very careful.  The SL team and I worked on stacking the bricks and putting them in a place where the rains would not harm the hard work we have done throughout their week here.

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Tomorrow there will be a going away party for the Service Learning group and the community members! It should be fun seeing everyone interacting and dancing together!

-Nelson Patterson

Reports From The Field I

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Small farming communities are often assumed to be timeless. When I think of the community that I lived in for two years in Nicaragua, I think about the people and activities as being constant. This stereotype is not fully without merit. When I visited the community a few times after I moved to the city for my third year of Peace Corps service I would ask if there was any news, and a common response was “Gracias a Dios no, todo esta bien.”

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Coming back to the communities in Ecuador for my second summer I thought things would be similar. In my most skeptical moments I even thought that our work was kind of like Sysiphus, any progress we would make together throughout the course of a summer would fade away and we would come back only to do the same thing all over again. I have been very surprised however that things feel different working and interacting in the communities this summer. I was surprised and delighted that many people remembered me and some remembered my name. Especially working in Bellamaria, participating in the mingas with the community members and talking with them and hearing them, I feel that there is a greater ease in our relationship, that is between Healthy Living and the community members. People come up to me just to talk about anything and call me by my name and remember it. We are able to share small jokes, including the nickname of one community member bien “El Chivo Loco”. It is much like a courtship that has moved beyond the initial stages of being very self conscious and nervous, wanting things to go right but at the same time not wanting to give too much away at once, to the stage of a better understanding and the developing of a real history between the two parties. As much as our project has advanced in terms of infrastructure and the organizing of more projects, this is just as great a development for true trust and understanding between the communities and our team will be invaluable as we move on together on our project.

-Conor

Conor Tong is the project coordinator for the Healthy Living Initiative. He is a graduate student studying International Development at Ohio University. This is his second year going down to Ecuador with the Tropical Disease Institute.